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As the "reblogging" culture of Tumblr becomes more pervasive, I thought I'd better make it clear what I'm okay with you doing with my public posts. Everything listed here is in addition to commenting on my journal, which is always welcome.

All of these permissions extend only to noncommercial use of my content. You may not use any of my content for commercial purposes.


My Fanfiction

YOU MAY: Write remixes, sequels, prequels, responses, or whatever. Make art or illustrations. Review, recommend, discuss, and link to fics. Translate a story or record a podcast of it so long as you let me know and give me appropriate credit as the author. Print or save copies (please make sure my name is attached as author).

YOU MAY NOT: Add my story to any archive without my permission. Repost any story in its entirely on your own journal, blog, or Tumblr even if you credit me.


My Nonfiction Public Posts

YOU MAY: Link, discuss, write response or follow-up posts on your own journal, blog, or Tumblr. Quote portions of my post(s) as needed.

YOU MAY NOT: Repost any post in its entirety on your own journal, blog, or Tumblr even if you credit me.



If you have any questions, just drop me a line here or PM me.



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master list of my fiction

This list includes all of my posted fanfiction, except for unfinished things and a few short pieces that I never even gave titles to. All my stories on LJ are also tagged; see the "fic" tags on my sidebar.

Within each category, stories are listed in reverse chronological order with the most recent at the top. I've included only the title and main characters here; see the header of each story for rating, any warnings, etc. Generally speaking, the first character listed is the POV character.

Please let me know if there are any problems with these links.

2013 Addendum: This post is no longer being updated. All of my newer stories and most of my old ones can be found at An Archive of Our Own, which has handy search features. They're also here on LJ and you can find them using my tags.


Blake's 7Collapse )

Buffy the Vampire SlayerCollapse )

DiscworldCollapse )

Doctor WhoCollapse )

due SouthCollapse )

Harry PotterCollapse )

Simon Pegg and/or Nick Frost fandomsCollapse )

TintinCollapse )

entertainment

Things I've been watching:

That Mitchell and Webb Look. I've been binge-watching this for a couple of days now. I'm enjoying it a lot even though I find it (usually) more wry than laugh-out-loud funny. Sometimes it's actively unfunny, as in the sketch where a man goes into a little shop ostensibly to buy food, ends up buying two cans of cheap strong beer instead, and it's clear that this is a routine he goes through every day as he desperately, hopelessly tries to cover up his alcoholism. I was astonished to hear the audience laughing at it (or was it a laugh track?). Apparently the last sketch from the very last episode was the (in)famous old Sherlock Holmes, which makes everyone cry; somehow I'm not surprised that Mitchell and Webb chose to end the show that way.

Parts Unknown, Anthony Bourdain's most recent show, which is less about extreme food adventures than Bourdain's previous work and focuses to a surprising extent on history, culture, and politics. I was loving it, and then we got to the episode about New Mexico, where I live. I found it oversimplified, almost stereotypical, and much too filtered through Bourdain's romantic obsession with cowboys and the west (and guns--there was a long segment of Bourdain with gun enthusiasts that I skipped most of because it made me so furious). So now I wonder if the whole show is like that and I just didn't notice because of my own ignorance; other episodes, especially those set in troubled parts of the world, did seem a lot more serious and balanced to me, though.

Weeks ago I started watching Captain America: Civil War on Netflix and got so bored about half an hour in that I still haven't finished it. I guess I'll watch the rest eventually, but the whole premise is so contrived that it's hard to care. But part of the problem could be me: I often have a hard time settling in to movies, even though I can watch episode after episode of a TV series.


Things I've been reading:

Right now I'm about halfway through Matter, one of Iain M. Banks's Culture novels. I'm enjoying it all right, but I don't understand why so many people say these books are the best thing ever. The ones I've read have all been a bit same-y, and so the worldbuilding that was initially so impressive ceases to impress. I do give Banks some points for naming a ship Eight Rounds Rapid, though.

Before that I read Dan Chaon's new mystery/thriller Ill Will, which, again, I liked well enough, but which also seemed like another example of that phenomenon where a "literary" novelist writes a genre book and is wildly overpraised for things that are, in fact, pretty typical of the genre. Chaon did throw in a few self-consciously literary touches, but I don't think they were necessary or even beneficial to the story. And plotwise, I still can't decide potential plot spoilersCollapse )

A while back I read Kai Ashante Wilson's Sorcerer of the Wildeeps but forgot to post about it. It's a little bit slight and short, story-wise (it's a novella, really, not a full novel) but it's fantastically well-written; I especially admire how Wilson melds African American Vernacular English and a high fantasy setting in a way that is first surprising and then just absolutely, seamlessly right. The worldbuilding is tantalizing, too, and I hope Wilson writes more in this universe. And did I mention that the main characters are queer men?


Other stuff: I have a 24-day streak on Duolingo in both German, which I'm just beginning, and French, which I studied for years and then neglected for years. Has anyone else noticed that some of the Duolingo example sentences are rather . . . dystopian? I keep getting ones like "Don't believe that soldier!" and "It's better to avoid that zone." Or, today, "A little robot came and saved them," which was nice.


A request: Now that I've joined the 21st century and have Netflix streaming and Spotify, I'd love recs for movies, TV shows, and especially music.



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recipe weekend

Something I've cooked recently: Yesterday I finally cooked the soup with rice and chicken livers that I wanted to cook weeks ago. Being me, I didn't follow Marcella Hazan's recipe but adapted it for my own purposes. What I didCollapse )

When I went shopping on Thursday I impulse-bought some dandelion greens, which I've never eaten before. Today I blanched some for about a minute in boiling water to reduce the bitterness, drained them, then cooked them in olive oil and garlic and ate them with some of the fava bean and potato puree that I cooked a while ago and have been keeping in the freezer. I put the greens in the bottom of a shallow pasta bowl and poured the puree over them. That was my breakfast* this morning, actually, and it was yummy.

*"Breakfast foods" are not usually my preferred breakfast foods. I like bacon and eggs, and I like pancakes and that sort of thing, but not all the time. So when I have leisure for a cooked breakfast it's often some kind of food more associated with lunch or dinner. Yesterday for breakfast I had tacos, though I suppose they were "breakfast tacos" (are breakfast tacos and burritos a thing outside of the southwestern US?) since the filling was scrambled eggs.


Something I have concrete plans to cook in the near future: I still have a lot of dandelion greens left, so later today I plan to make a salad of dandelion greens and spinach with a hot bacon dressing. There will probably still be some dandelion greens left after that, but I have no plans yet for the remainder.

I'm going to cook a lot of bacon at once and use the remainder for a potato salad with blue cheese and bacon that is one of my favorite foods ever.

I'm also, probably tomorrow, going to cook the stir-fried ground pork and greens with fermented bean curd that I mentioned in my last food post. I suppose I could add the dandelion greens to that, although I do have a big bunch of Chinese mustard greens I bought specifically for the purpose.

Yes, I am on a bit of a greens kick.


Something I'm vaguely thinking about cooking eventually: Dunno. I should look through my cookbooks. The weather here has been changeable, which makes it hard to know what I'll want to eat in the future. Not much more than a week ago we had high temperatures close to 80 F (26.6 C); in the past week it's been much colder and has snowed overnight several times. Anyway, I have so much food in the pantry that I should probably try to minimize shopping for the next couple of weeks and use some of what I already have.

I've been wanting to bake a cake but I still have uneaten treats from the last time I baked. Mmm, I think I'll have a slice of cranberry/dried cherry cake.



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recipe weekend

Something I've cooked recently: Today I made an asparagus and smoked salmon tart. I couldn't find a recipe that was exactly what I wanted, so I improvised. Here's what I didCollapse )

I bought some raclette cheese on sale recently, so I've had raclette, or at least raclette adopted for a single person without a fireplace, twice. The first time I went fairly traditional, boiling some new potatoes, then topping them with shredded raclette and broiling until the cheese was all melted and oozy. The second time, I sort of made my own version of chile cheese fries--I cut some baking potatoes into wedges, coated them with oil, salt, and smoked paprika and roasted them until crisp outside and soft inside, and then covered a big mound of them with raclette and broiled.


Something I have concrete plans to cook in the near future: No concrete plans. I need to keep using an opened jar of fermented bean curd I have in the fridge, so I may make this recipe for bean curd with Chinese cabbage and ground pork, or something similar. The weather has been ridiculously warm here for March, so I mostly feel interested in salads and pastas and such.


Something I vaguely plan to cook someday: Oh, everything, as usual. I've been craving seafood, which is a problem because while I love eating it, I really don't love cooking it. Shrimp would be helpful for this, since you can get them conveniently frozen and pre-peeled, but since I've heard about shrimp farms ruining the environment and literally using slave labor, I haven't wanted to buy shrimp. Anybody know of US brands that are okay to buy?



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that St Patrick's day meme

1. Have you ever been to Ireland?

Twice. I have been to Dublin, Cork, Galway, Limerick, Ennis, Lisdoonvarna ("Oh, Lisdoonvarna," as Christy Moore sings; the town had three very musical pubs and one hostel with a peat fire and no electricity), Doolin, the cliffs of Moher (walked there from Doolin, including a bit where the path was uncomfortably close to the edge of the cliff), Inis Mor, Spiddal, Gleann Cholm Cille, Cushendall, Belfast (where I lost track of the number of people who said to me, "We're not like what you see on television"--this was over twenty years ago and the ceasefire was new and shaky-- and also where I went to a Christy Moore concert), and Derry.


2. According to Facts about Ireland, 73% of Americans are unable to locate Ireland on a map bereft of country names. Whether you are American or not, can you find it on a map?

Yes.


3. Are you or do you know a natural redhead?

*sigh* Fetishizing red hair is creepy. I did date a redhead once, but not because of his hair color.


4. Will you be celebrating St Patrick's Day?

I have a bottle of Smithwick's in the fridge and will probably drink it tonight at some point. I don't care for St. Patrick's Day; back when I was most involved with Irish/Irish-American cultural stuff, we all took it deeply seriously and disliked the green beer and shamrocks and goddamn leprechauns and all that begorrah shite. (Heh, all this reminiscing has made me apt, like Laurie Odell, to become Irish.) My Irish-language teacher, a drinking man who loved a party, used to get a stern look about him as March 17th rolled around and would say, "St. Patrick founded no taverns, only churches."


5. Do you even know who St. Patrick is and why we celebrate his day?

He converted Ireland to Christianity, thereby doing it no great favor, although Irish monks did help keep learning and art alive through some rough centuries.



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The Good Place

I spent yesterday and this afternoon binge-watching S1 of The Good Place. It's funny and serious and generally amazing, and you should watch it! It tells the story of Eleanor, who after her sudden death finds that she's one of a tiny number of humans who have been accepted into The Good Place, where she'll spend eternity in bliss with her soulmate. And that's all I'm going to tell you, because it's best to watch the show as unspoiled as possible.



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a post that's not about food

1) The first episode of Buffy aired twenty years ago. Buffy was my first fandom, although I didn't start watching until the summer reruns before S7, and didn't connect to the actual fandom until the summer after that. In some ways it's still the greatest fandom experience I've ever had--such excitement and interest, so many smart people writing smart things--and in some ways it was the worst. But fandom changed my life, and I wouldn't have found it without Buffy. Also, the show was, despite some failings, wonderful, and I will fight anyone who says otherwise.

I feel like I should watch an episode, but I can't decide which one. I've been contemplating a re-watch, so I guess I could start at the beginning . . .


2) I finished the Aubrey/Maturin re-read some time ago, then I re-read most of Jane Austen, and now I've moved on to some new stuff. I can recommend Lyndsay Faye's The Whole Art of Detection: Lost Mysteries of Sherlock Holmes, which is the best professional Holmes pastiche I know of. Faye stays essentially true to the canon, without any of the tedious innovations (Holmes in America! Holmes solve the Ripper murders! Holmes was Jack the Ripper!) that many other writers perpetrate.* The things she brings to the canon are good things, such as a subtle and never preachy concern for the rights of women and the poor and some reasonable attempts at resolving canonical contradictions. What she brings to pastiche is what's so often lacking: emotion. Holmes and Watson's affection for each other is central. My favorite stories are the ones set during and after the Great Hiatus, exploring Watson's grief and then, after Holmes's return, his anger and hurt. There's nothing explicitly queer here, but the stories from Holmes's POV make it abundantly clear, I think, that Holmes is in love with Watson in some fashion beyond friendship. Watson, alas, is shown as even straighter than canon makes him--he's constantly noticing women--but his love for Holmes is deep and enduring.

*She does put Watson in America in one story, set before Holmes and Watson meet. It makes nonsense of Watson's timeline and isn't a great story, but I forgive Faye because the other stories are so good.

Faye is also the author of the excellent Timothy Wilde series, set in New York in the 1840s when a professional police force was developing, and the country was moving inexorably towards civil war. The books are beautifully written in a distinct, fascinating, slangy voice, there's an amazing sense of place and history, and there are canonical queer characters in important roles.

3) Right now I'm reading the late Oliver Sacks's autobiography, On the Move, and enjoying it very much. Things I didn't know about Oliver Sacks: he was gay, he was into motorcycles and bodybuilding as a young man, and he found lasting romantic love for the first time at the age of 75. Cool stuff.


4) I've started doing Duolingo again, on my phone this time, learning German and brushing up my French. I'm trying to read some French every day, which I haven't done for years . . . also on my phone. I never thought I would be someone who would use their phone so much, but it seems I am. Some stuff is just easier that way; I don't know why. I'm staying much more aware of the news, too.

Lest you think it's all SRS BZNS, I admit to spending a lot of time playing Atomas. It's fun and complicated in just the right way for me, because the rules are simple but the nuances are endless. Plus it's completely nonverbal, and since I'm a highly word-focused person, that helps me relax, whereas Scrabble makes me tense.



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recipe Friday

I'm actually posting this on Friday for a change!

Something I've cooked recently: I finally got around to cooking the quails. It's just as well I didn't go to the expense and effort of the sweetbread stuffing, because after about four bites, my fun new issue with meat textures kicked in. So the quails ended up in the stock pot along with a few stray bones I had in the freezer--chicken, pork, rude person. I had intended to make an Italian soup with rice, peas, and chicken livers, but then chicken livers were not to be had, so I cooked some rice in the stock and finished it in an old-fashioned French way with cream and a beaten egg. It was nice enough, but the cream rather overpowered the flavor of the lovely stock.

I also made a vaguely salade niçoise type thing with romaine lettuce, tuna, cooked potatoes, cooked green beans, tomatoes, and cucumber with an anchovy vinaigrette. One especially nice thing about this is that it keeps, so I got two dinner portions and two sandwiches for work out of it (to make the sandwich, stuff as much salad as you can into a hollowed-out section of baguette and drizzle on a little extra vinaigrette).

And, continuing this unexpected French theme, I cooked a vaguely cassoulet type thing. I took about a pound and a half of dried white beans (soaked overnight) and put them in an earthenware baking dish along with two carrots, two ribs of celery, and one large onion all cut into big chunks, plus about eight peeled garlic cloves. To that I added about a pound and a half of country style pork ribs on the bone (large pieces of fat removed), a bay leaf, a little salt, about a tablespoon of duck fat drizzled over, and enough water to cover the beans and most of the meat. I cooked it, covered, in a very low oven (about 225 F or 107 C) for a couple of hours, then added two supposedly French-style garlic sausages, whole, and two cut-up smoked garlicky and peppery sausages and cooked it for another couple of hours, removing as many of the vegetables as I could fish out after about an hour. I'd intended to add some kale and beet greens at this point but there wasn't room. Anyway, it turned out very nice; the beans were beautifully tender and the cooking liquid had lots of flavor. The pork ribs also come out tender and falling off the bone, but still with good flavor in the meat, so people without my texture issues might want to pull the meat into pieces and return it to the dish.


Something I have concrete plans to cook in the near future: Today, I bake! Naturally, the consequence of my sugar-reduction decision (which is, I can have any sweet things I bake or cook myself, but no soda and, as much as I can manage, no storebought cakes, cookies, candy bars, etc.) is that I'm going to bake a lemon-glazed loaf cake with dried cranberries and cherries. Er, and some brownies. Not just any brownies, mind you, but Aztec Gold Brownies, which are the best brownies I've ever made or eaten and possibly the best brownies in the world. I mean, if I'm trying to eat less sugar, I'd better make sure it's quality sugar, right?


Something I'm vaguely thinking about cooking someday: Everything? So many recipes, so little time. It's been unseasonably warm here, which has got me craving spring and summer things instead of the hearty pies I'd been meaning to bake all winter. Hmm, maybe an asparagus tart?



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Logan

I saw Logan today. Non-spoilery reaction: it's pretty damn good and you should see it if you have any interest in the X-Men movieverse(s). Don't (unlike some idiots I saw today) bring young kids, though, because it's also pretty damn violent--apparently the creators thought they needed to justify that R rating with lots of blood.

Spoilers, spoilers, and more spoilers ensueCollapse )



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one thing about Sherlock S4

I just finished watching it yesterday, and there were some things I really liked, some things I thought were just strange, and one thing that irritated me enormously. Guess what I'm going to talk about?

not spoilery for plot but somewhat for character developmentCollapse )



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recipe Friday on Sunday

Something I've cooked recently: Yesterday I cooked a fava bean and potato puree from a recipe in Lynn Rosetto Kasper's The Italian Country Table. Naturally I mucked about with it by adding in some Greek loukanika sausage that I bought on sale a few weeks ago; it turned out to be too strong for me to want to eat it plain, but it seemed just the thing to flavor a pot of beans, and indeed the result was pretty nice. It turns out, though, that cooked dried fava beans taste a lot like split peas. I like split peas well enough, but it was a bit disappointing to pay for favas and get split pea results.

Also yesterday I made a batch of lemon curd, and then baked some eclair shells to put the lemon curd into. I used an actual piping bag to shape the pastry, and the results weren't too bad considering I've never piped anything before in my life, but there's room for improvement in that and also in making sure they're baked enough. Nevertheless, even less-than-perfect lemon curd eclairs are yummy.


Something I'm going to cook in the near future: Today I'm using up the egg whites left over from the lemon curd by baking mini-pavlova shells. While googling around for recipes I discovered a nifty-sounding trick: using toasted sugar to make the meringue more complex and less sweet. So I currently have two pounds of sugar toasting in my oven. I'll let you know how it works.

I'm also going to roast the quail that have been hanging around in my freezer for a while (the ones I bought thinking they were boneless, but they weren't). I'll make a sherry-mushroom sauce for them and some roasted potatoes.


Something I'm vaguely thinking about cooking eventually: Many many things, as always. There are still a million savory pies I want to bake before the weather gets too warm. And I have a jar of fermented bean curd in my cupboard that I've been nerving myself up to use. (Er, not in a pie. I have trouble committing myself to cooking just one cuisine, even for only a week or so, so my pantry always overflows with ingredients. I'll probably use the bean curd in stir-fried pork and greens.)



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my usual question

I've watched about half of the first episode of The Man in the High Castle. Have any of you seen the series? Is it worth continuing? So far the show hasn't managed to make me care about the US being ruled by fascists, much less about its deeply boring straight white protagonists. But that could just be a case of the first episode being made as insipid as possible in order, in the minds of showrunners, to appeal to a broad audience.



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internet can haz

I'm back! With real internet that doesn't rely on stupid unreliable hotspots. Or using my phone's data allowance.

*hugs all of you*

*hugs Netflix streaming as well*



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not OK, computer

Weird problem which I hope someone with technical knowledge might be able to offer suggestions about. So: on Thursday evening I was able to connect to the internet from home using the wifi hotspot network I always use. On Friday morning, I couldn't. There was no connection at all, not even the one to the wifi sign-in page. Troubleshooting brought up the message "Wi-fi has no valid IP configuration." After several attempts I was able to fix it and it worked on Friday evening. Saturday morning it was dead again and wouldn't respond to the reset that had worked before.

I tried the first and sixth solutions here and they didn't work; most of the others aren't relevant to me because I don't have a router.

I tried connecting my old computer to the network and it seemed to work--at least, I was able to get as far as the wifi sign-in page, which I couldn't with the new one.

And today I took the new computer to Starbucks, where lo and behold, it connects just fine, not only to Starbucks wifi but to the network (xfinity) that I couldn't connect to at home.

So the problem is not my computer, right? But probably the local router I'm connecting through, which I have no control over because it's xfinity's router and not mine. At least this is what I'm assuming. But I don't want to keep having no connectivity from home, especially because since getting the new computer I can actually stream movies and music now.

So I guess I should contact xfinity, although the last time I had a problem they were incredibly unhelpful. But could the problem somehow be on my end? I'm wondering how my old computer could still connect.


ETA: Some research has shown that I can get a proper internet connection for less than I'm now paying for hotspot access, so I guess it doesn't really matter.



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recipe Friday

Somthing I've cooked recently: Tonight I had the dinner of Good Shopping Luck. I treated myself to a pork chop from the fancy butcher, and then when I was in the supermarket I found some beautiful asparagus, seriously the nicest asparagus by far that I've ever seen in a supermarket, and on sale, too. So that plus some oven roasted potato wedges was dinner. The pork in particular was amazing, even though I overcooked it a little. I'd forgotten that pork actually has flavor. Om nom nom.


Something I have concrete plans to cook in the near future: Tomorrow I'm cooking a bean soup with escarole and garlic, and on Sunday there'll be mushroom risotto. I may also bake some spice cookies from the recipe in Ottolenghi and Tamimi's Jerusalem--I've been wanting to bake these for ages but I could never find currants anywhere.


Something I'm vaguely thinking about cooking someday: It turns out I bought the wrong kind of quail for the sweetbread-stuffed quail from the Hannibal cookbook--I needed de-boned quail and I bought bone-in. I did watch an instructional video on You-Tube about how to do it myself, but if it takes Jacques Pepin five minutes to de-bone a quail, it'll take me half an hour and a lot of swearing, and I have four of the little beasts. So I'll use the current batch of quail for something else, perhaps pan-roasted with a sherry and mushroom sauce, and see if I can find boneless quail anywhere.



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Broadchurch S2

I watched Broadchurch S2 and thought it was good in many ways, but definitely not up to the standards of S1.

A few thoughts, including massive spoilers for the endings of both seriesCollapse )



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Broadchurch

I just finished watching the last episode of S1 of Broadchurch.

Floods of tears. What a fantastic series. Okay, dubious police procedures, but emotionally just about perfect.

Is S2 also good, or does it ruin the exquisitely crafted story that is S1 by trying to continue it?



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Fandomless: Blue ship
kindkit
when regiment is gone

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